International Journal of One Health

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Research (Published online: 26-02-2017)

1. Risk factors associated with cystic echinococcosis in humans in selected pastoral and agro-pastoral areas of Uganda - Emmanuel Othieno, Andrew Livex Okwi, Ezekiel Mupere, Eberhard Zeyhle, Peter Oba, Martin Chamai, Leonard Omadang, Francis Olaki Inangolet, Ludwing Siefert, Francis Ejobi and Michael Ocaido

International Journal of One Health, 3: 1-6

 

 

  doi: 10.14202/IJOH.2017.1-6

 

Emmanuel Othieno: School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7072, Kampala, Uganda.

Andrew Livex Okwi: School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7072, Kampala, Uganda.

Ezekiel Mupere: School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7072, Kampala, Uganda.

Eberhard Zeyhle: Hydatid Disease Unit, African Medical and Research Foundation, P.O. Box 30125, Wilson Airport, Langata Road, Nairobi 00100, Kenya.

Peter Oba: School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Resources, College of Veterinary Medicine, Animal Resources and Biosecurity, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda.

Martin Chamai: School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Resources, College of Veterinary Medicine, Animal Resources and Biosecurity, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda.

Leonard Omadang: School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Resources, College of Veterinary Medicine, Animal Resources and Biosecurity, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda.

Francis Olaki Inangolet: Napak District Veterinary Office, Karamoja, Uganda.

Ludwing Siefert: School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Resources, College of Veterinary Medicine, Animal Resources and Biosecurity, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda.

Francis Ejobi: School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Resources, College of Veterinary Medicine, Animal Resources and Biosecurity, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda.

Michael Ocaido: School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Resources, College of Veterinary Medicine, Animal Resources and Biosecurity, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda.

 

Received: 29-09-2016, Accepted: 01-02-2017, Published online: 27-02-2017

 

Corresponding author: Emmanuel Othieno, e-mail: othienoemma@yahoo.com


Citation: Othieno E, Okwi AL, Mupere E, Zeyhle E, Oba P, Chamai M, Omadang L, Inangolet FO, Siefert L, Ejobi F, Ocaido M. Risk factors associated with cystic echinococcosis in humans in selected pastoral and agro-pastoral areas of Uganda. Int J One Health 2017;3:1-6.


Abstract


Aim: It was to determine the risk factors responsible of occurrence of cystic echinococcosis (CE) of humans in the pastoral and agro-pastoral (PAP) in Uganda.

Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in districts: Moroto, Napak, Nakapiripirit and Amudat in Karamoja region; in agro-pastoral communities of Teso region, in the districts of Kumi and Bukedea; Nakasongola district in Central region and in Kasese district in the Western region. People were subjected to voluntary ultrasound screening for CE. Those found positive to CE on ultrasound screening were interviewed using a special designed form to find out the probable predisposing factors for acquisition of CE infection. Predisposing factors considered were location, age, sex, dog ownership, occupation, water source, and religion. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify key risk factors.

Results: In Karamoja region, being female, age beyond 40 years and open spring water sources were the risk factors. While for Nakasongola age beyond 40 years was a risk factor. In Kasese dog ownership, age >60 years and being a Muslim were risk factors. In Teso region dog ownership and age >60 years were the risk factors.

Conclusion: Being a pastoralist, a female, increasing age beyond 40 years, open spring water sources, dog ownership and being a Muslim were the risk factors for CE in PAP areas in Uganda.

Keywords: agro-pastoral, cystic echinococcosis, humans, risk factors pastoral, Uganda.


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