International Journal of One Health

Open access and peer reviewed journal on Human, Animal and Environmental health

ISSN (Online): 2455-8931

ISSN (Print): 2455-5673

 

 


  Home


  Editorial board


  Instructions to authors


  Reviewer guideline


  Open access policy


  Archives


  FAQ


 

 

Open Access

Copyright: The Authors. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution
4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and
reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the
Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/ publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.


Research (Published online: 05-05-2017)

3. Brucellosis: Community, medical and veterinary workers’ knowledge, attitudes, and practices in Northern Uganda - Harriet Muloki Nabirye, Joseph Erume, George William Nasinyama, Joseph Morison Kungu, Jesca Nakavuma, Duncan Ongeng and David Okello Owiny

International Journal of One Health, 3: 12-18

 

 

  doi: 10.14202/IJOH.2017.12-18

 

Harriet Muloki Nabirye: Department of Biosecurity, Ecosystems and Veterinary Public Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, Animal Resources and Biosecurity, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7062 Kampala, Uganda; Department of Animal Production and Range Management, Faculty of Agriculture and Environment, Gulu University. P. O. Box 166, Gulu, Uganda.

Joseph Erume: Department of Biomolecular Resources and Biolab Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Animal Resources and Biosecurity, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7062 Kampala, Uganda.

George William Nasinyama: Department of Biosecurity, Ecosystems and Veterinary Public Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, Animal Resources and Biosecurity, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7062 Kampala, Uganda.

Joseph Morison Kungu: Department of Livestock Health, National Livestock Resources Research Institute, P. O. Box 96, Tororo, Uganda.

Jesca Nakavuma: Department of Biomolecular Resources and Biolab Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Animal Resources and Biosecurity, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7062 Kampala, Uganda.

Duncan Ongeng: Department of Animal Production and Range Management, Faculty of Agriculture and Environment, Gulu University. P. O. Box 166, Gulu, Uganda.

David Okello Owiny: Department of Biotechnical and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Animal Resources and Biosecurity, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7062 Kampala, Uganda.

 

Received: 15-02-2017, Accepted: 12-04-2017, Published online: 05-05-2017

 

Corresponding author: David Okello Owiny, e-mail: owinyd@gmail.com


Citation: Nabirye HM, Erume J, Nasinyama GW, Kungu JM, Nakavuma J, Ongeng D, Owiny DO (2017) Brucellosis: Community, medical and veterinary workers’ knowledge, attitudes, and practices in Northern Uganda, Int J One Health 2017;3:12-18.


Abstract


Aim: This study aimed at determining the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of the community, medical and veterinary workers regarding brucellosis.

Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at selected health facilities in Apac, Gulu, Lira, and Pader districts of Northern Uganda using a standardized questionnaire. A total of 251 patients testing positive for brucellosis using the Brucella plate agglutination test, 59 medical and 29 veterinary workers were studied. Chi-square test at 95% confidence level was used to analyze data.

Results: Only 8% patients, 15.3% medical, and 21.4% veterinary workers were knowledgeable on transmission methods and symptoms for brucellosis and knowledge differed according to the level of education among patients (p=0.001), medical (p=0.001), and veterinary workers (p=0.012). Over 80% patients, medical and veterinary workers had a positive attitude. Only 8% patients, 13.6% medical, and 7.1% veterinary workers had good practices regarding brucellosis control.

Conclusion: Poor knowledge, poor practices, and positive attitude provide an opportunity for health education and policy formulation for the control of brucellosis. The prevalence studies of human and animal brucellosis are recommended to determine the magnitude of the problem.

Keywords: awareness, Brucellosis, patients, practitioners, Uganda.


References


1. Abubakar M, Mansoor M, Arshed M. Bovine brucellosis: Old and new concepts with Pakistan perspective. Pak Vet J 2011;32:147-55.
 
2. Schelling E, Diguimbaye C, Daoud S, Nicolet J, Boerlin P, Tanner M, et al. Brucellosis and Q-fever seroprevalences of nomadic pastoralists and their livestock in Chad. Prev Vet Med 2003;61:279-93.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2003.08.004
PMid:14623412
 
3. FAO. Brucella Melitensis in Eurasia and the Middle East. FAO Animal Production and Health Proceedings. Vol. 10; 2010. p. 1-47.
 
4. Mantur BG, Amarnath SK, Shinde SR. Review of clinical and laboratory features of human brucellosis. Vet Microbiol 2007;25:188-202.
https://doi.org/10.4103/0255-0857.34758
 
5. Moreno E, Cloeckaert A, Moriyón I. Brucella evolution and taxonomy. Vet Microbiol 2002;90:209-27.
https://doi.org/10.1016/S0378-1135(02)00210-9
 
6. Corbel MJ. Brucellosis in humans and animals brucellosis in humans and animals. World Health Organization in Collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Geneva, Switzerland: World Organization for Animal Health; 2006. p. 7, 89.
PMCid:PMC1698075
 
7. Sayyad S, Malak MM, Miri BA, Gharib SM, Vahabi A. The prevalence rate of human brucellosis in Sanandaj county, West of Iran. Life Sci J 2014;11:23-5.
 
8. Mantur BG, Mulimani MS, Bidari LH, Akki AS, Tikare NV. Bacteremia is as unpredictable as clinical manifestations in human brucellosis. Int J Infect Dis 2008;12:303-7.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2007.09.004
PMid:18023384
 
9. Smits HL, Cutler SJ. Contributions of biotechnology to the control and prevention of brucellosis in Africa. Afr J Biotechnol 2004;3:631-6.
 
10. Howyida SA, Lamiaa TA, Kamel AZ. Awareness of personnel in direct contact with animals regarding brucellosis. J Am Sci 2012;8:790-6.
 
11. Lindahl E, Sattorov N, Boqvist S, Magnusson U. A study of knowledge, attitudes and practices relating to brucellosis among small-scale dairy farmers in an urban and peri-urban area of Tajikistan. PLoS One 2015;10:e0117318.
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0117318
PMid:25668783 PMCid:PMC4323107
 
12. Seleem MN, Boyle SM, Sriranganathan N. Brucellosis: A re-emerging zoonosis. Vet Microbiol 2010;140:392-8.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2009.06.021
PMid:19604656
 
13. Galukande M, Muwazi S, Mugisa DB. Aetiology of low back pain in Mulago Hospital, Uganda. Afr Health Sci 2005;5:164-7.
PMid:16006225 PMCid:PMC1831909
 
14. Kyebambe PS. Acute Brucella meningomyeloencephalo - Spondylosis in a teenage male. Afr Health Sci 2005;5:69-72.
PMid:15843135 PMCid:PMC1831902
 
15. Kansiime C, Mugisha A, Makumbi F, Mugisha S, Rwego IB, Sempa J, et al. Knowledge and perceptions of brucellosis in the pastoral communities adjacent to Lake Mburo National Park, Uganda. BMC Public Health 2014;14:242.
https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-14-242
PMid:24612845 PMCid:PMC3975325
 
16. Makita K, Fèvre EM, Waiswa C, Kaboyo W, Eisler MC, Welburn SC. Spatial epidemiology of hospital-diagnosed brucellosis in Kampala, Uganda. Int J Health Geogr 2011;10:1-9.
https://doi.org/10.1186/1476-072X-10-52
PMid:21962176 PMCid:PMC3196682
 
17. Kozukeev TB, Ajeilat S, Maes E, Favorov M. Risk factors for brucellosis - Leylek and Kadamjay districts, Batken Oblast. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2003;86:31-4.
 
18. Wojno JM, Moodley C, Pienaar J, Beylis N, Jacobsz L, Nicol MP, et al. Human brucellosis in South Africa: Public health and diagnostic pitfalls. S Afr Med J 2016;106:883-5.
https://doi.org/10.7196/SAMJ.2016.v106i9.11020
PMid:27601111
 
19. Chipwaza B, Mugasa JP, Mayumana I, Amuri M, Makungu C, Gwakisa PS. Community knowledge and attitudes and health workers' practices regarding non-malaria febrile illnesses in Eastern Tanzania. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2014;8:e2896.
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0002896
PMid:24852787 PMCid:PMC4031176
 
20. Apac District Local Government. Apac Statistical Abstract. Uganda Bureau of Statistics Kampala Uganda, UBOS. District Local Government Statistical Abstract; 2012, June. p. 26-31.
 
21. Uganda Bureau of Statistics. Gulu District Local Government. Gulu Statistical Abstract. Kampala, Uganda: Uganda Bureau of Statistics; 2013. p. 60-70.
 
22. Uganda Bureau of Statistics. Lira District Local Government. Lira Statistical Abstract. Kampala, Uganda: Uganda Bureau of Statistics; 2012. p. 20-31.
 
23. Uganda Bureau of Statistics. Pader District Local Government. Pader Statistical Abstract. Kampala, Uganda: Uganda Bureau of Statistics; 2009. p. 10-4.
 
24. UBOS. Uganda National Household Survey 2012/13. Kampala, Uganda: Uganda Bureau of Statistics; 2014. p. 97, 98.
 
25. Adesiji YO, Adesiji GB, Fagabami AH. Brucellosis: Knowledge, attitude and practices among occupationall exposed indviduals in Osun state. Sci Focus 2005;10:38-41.
 
26. Ministry of Finance, Planning and Economic Development.The Republic of Uganda Poverty Status Report. Kampala, Uganda: Economic Development Policy and Research Department; 2014. p. 58, 64.
 
27. Grahn C. Brucellosis in Small Ruminants - An Investigation of Knowledge, Attitude and Practices in Peri-Urban Farming Around the Region of Dushanbe, Tajikistan. Vol. 1652-8697. Uppsala; 2013. p. 1-22.
 

E-mail: editoronehealth@gmail.com, Website: www.onehealthjournal.org, Publisher: Veterinary World